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Stereoscopic Cinema and the Origins of 3-D Film 1838 -1952

Sometimes I watch terrible movies so you don’t have to, and occasionally I even read boring books so you don’t have to. See how good I am to you?

But seriously, Stereoscopic Cinema and the Origins of 3-D Film 1838-1952 is probably going to be more interesting to silent film fans than anyone else, including 3-D film fans or stereographers. The never ending parade of patent numbers remind be of the “he begat then he begat who begat blah blah blah” section of the Good Book – you know the set up before the action and character development. But still, you can skim the patents and just read the cool parts, of which there are many.

Check out my review over at Toronto Film Scene:

Stereoscopic Cinema and the Origins of 3-D Film 1838 -1952

3-D film is all the rage these days, not least because the Hollywood superstructure decided to invest heavily in the production and distribution of this technology. “This is it!” they say, “3-D is here to stay this time!” “You’re gonna love it!” But as Ray Zone thoroughly demonstrates in Stereoscopic Cinema and the Origins of 3-D Film 1838-1952 inventors, technologists, filmmakers, and production studios have been chasing that stereoscopic dragon for a long, long time. CLICK ON TO READ THE REST

 

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